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19 pages of results.
11. British Spooks "Who's Who" part 2 [Lobster #10 (Jan 1986)]
... . 10.71), (courtesy of the FBI). A number of officers, mainly wartime, were also named in Philby's book My Silent War and in the various biographies written following his defection. (GCHQ) Government Communications Headquarters. Operatives of GCHQ are named in the early editions of the Diplomatic List. Increasingly they are hidden, though they can be traced by reference to GCHQ outposts like Darwin (Australia). Also known as the 'Government Code and Cypher School' (GCCS) (BF) British Intelligence and Covert Action, Jonathan Bloch and Patrick Fitzgerald (Brandon 1983), contains an appendix which lists 'certain civil servants who have held official posts overseas ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 5  -  01 Jan 1986  -  URL: http://www.lobster-magazine.co.uk/online/issue10/lob10-04.htm
... including Aims, Common Cause, Economic League, IRIS, the Centre for the Study of Religion and Communism (19) and the Slavic Gospel Association. Stewart-Smith's contributions to the campaign against the left in 1974 included publication of three pamphlets: Not To Be Trusted: left-wing extremism in the Labour and Liberal parties. The Hidden Face of the Labour Party The Hidden Face of the Liberal Party We've read the first of these, and from press accounts of the second and third they appear to be merely reprints of sections of it. One report (20) said that Stewart-Smith was planning to distribute between 1 and 3 million copies of The Hidden Face ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 35  -  01 Apr 1986  -  URL: http://www.lobster-magazine.co.uk/online/issue11/lob11-03.htm
13. The anti-union/strike-breaking organisations [Lobster #12 (Sep 1986)]
... , in Weiner Library Bulletin (Special Edition). Robert Benewick, The Fascist Movement in Britain (London 1972) p190 Benewick p289 Gisela C. Lebzelter, Henry Hamilton Beamish and the Britons; Champions of Anti-Semitism in Lunn and Thurlow (eds) see fn 4 above: first (unnumbered) page of her essay. The hidden anti-semitism of the political Right in this period is visible, for example, in the autobiography of John Baker White (fn 68 above). White (p123) describes Nesta Webster as a "far-seeing woman of whom I saw a good deal..writer of books on secret societies and subversion"; and ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 5  -  01 Sep 1986  -  URL: http://www.lobster-magazine.co.uk/online/issue12/lob12-35.htm
14. Irangate and Secret Arms-for-Hostage Deal [Lobster #14 (Nov 1987)]
... the 1980 Reagan Campaign gave to the dreaded possibility that Carter might bring the 52 hostages home before the election, and win due to a last-minute gratitude vote. As early as March 1980, Richard Wirthlin, Reagan's pollster, had determined that an absolute condition of a Reagan victory was that an "October Surprise" not happen (Hidden Power, by Roland Perry, pp. 123 and 124). Using the Campaign's sophisticated computerised polling forecasting system called PINS, he had calculated that Carter would pick up 5-6 extra percentage points if he brought the hostages home at any time before the election, and a whopping 10 percentage points - for a dreaded sure victory ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 42  -  01 Nov 1987  -  URL: http://www.lobster-magazine.co.uk/online/issue14/lob14-01.htm
15. Fiji coup update [Lobster #15 (Feb 1988)]
... -30 Two C-130 "Mercy" support aircraft landed in Nausori and one at Nadi to drop off 30 passengers for USNS "Mercy" teams from Tonga and Kiribati and to transport 12 passengers to Guam. | R All of the landings were cleared through normal diplomatic channels. None carried troops to Fiji, nor were any arrivals hidden from public view. Conclusion It can be seen that, apart from deliberate disinformation, a fair amount of sloppy work in the initial coverage of the Fiji coup also helped to contribute to disinformation concerning the event. Media outlets appeared more ready to embrace the spectacular claims than to look more closely at some of the domestic elements behind the ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 5  -  01 Feb 1988  -  URL: http://www.lobster-magazine.co.uk/online/issue15/lob15-06.htm
... whence issues a magazine called Counterpoint, devoted to the exposure and analysis of Soviet disinformation. The trail began with the defection of Stanislas Levchenko, a Major in the KGB. He went over to the Americans in 1979, spent a year working with the Readers' Digest's John Barron, during which he briefed Barron for his KGB: The Hidden Hand Today. (International Herald Tribune 8 June 1983). Levchenko told tales of Soviet disinformation and so-called 'active measures'. His revelations lead to a briefing document in July 1981 on 'Soviet Active Measures', a sanitised version of which was widely distributed to the media and various authors close to the Agency. Since then ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 15  -  01 Jun 1988  -  URL: http://www.lobster-magazine.co.uk/online/issue16/lob16-13.htm
17. Philby naming names [Lobster #16 (Jun 1988)]
... Randel (sic), Clifford, Vitol (sic), Howard, Newman, Temple, Rowly (sic), Noel-Clark (sic), Steel (sic), Chalmers and others. Presently such BIS representatives as Witbread (sic), Golty (sic), Speadding (sic) are working there; people who hidden themselves behind various diplomatic positions. Lebanon's British Embassy's First Secretaries Sindal (sic) and Joy are also currently active on behalf of the British espionage system. Reliable sources report that it was in Beirut that the SPA service group for the BIS was organized, that is the service who deals with falsifications and provocations and if necessary with terror ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 5  -  01 Jun 1988  -  URL: http://www.lobster-magazine.co.uk/online/issue16/lob16-03.htm
18. Print: Journals and book review [Lobster #17 (Nov 1988)]
... a convicted drug dealer turned informant who worked closely with Vice President George Bush's anti-drug task force in Washington. But the 1984 investigation got derailed when Seal told his handlers that cocaine was being trans-shipped through Nicaragua with the permission of high-level government officials. In an effort to frame the Sandinistas, the CIA installed a hidden camera in Seal's C-130 cargo plane (the same plane, incidentally, that later crashed in Nicaragua leading to the capture of Eugene Hasenfus in October 1986). Seal took a blurry snapshot which purported to show himself with a high-level Nicaraguan official named Federico Vaughn, and a Colombian drug czar unloading bags of cocaine at ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 13  -  01 Nov 1988  -  URL: http://www.lobster-magazine.co.uk/online/issue17/lob17-13.htm
... xviii. Although the terms 'clandestine' and 'covert' are often used as synonyms today, even by intelligence personnel, they in fact refer to different sorts of actions. According to former Office of Strategic Services (OSS) operative Christopher Felix (pseudonym) clandestine operations are 'hidden but not disguised', whereas covert operations are 'disguised but not hidden'. Thus the former would apply to a group of camoflaged armed men seeking to disembark secretly on, say, the Cuban coast, the latter would apply to the landing of a CIA operative at Havana airport under business or State Department cover. See his fascinating and revelatory work (1963) pp. 27-9 . Cf ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 8  -  01 Oct 1989  -  URL: http://www.lobster-magazine.co.uk/online/issue18/lob18-01.htm
20. Telecommunications at the End of the World [Lobster #18 (Oct 1989)]
... that they will be amongst the lines usurped for EMSS. Private lines rented by the military are similarly connected at exchanges. However, they are otherwise 'routed to avoid potential target areas' and 'can be made independent of mains power supply. '( 15) Public Interest and Public Emergencies The existence of emergency telephone systems has apparently been kept hidden to allow war planners their customary secrecy. This attitude has resulted in the provision of powerful networks that could be, but are not, applicable to peacetime emergencies. Telephone Preference working existed in one form or another for more than forty years, but was not fully usable until the Home Office eventually decided to declassify it. Even after ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 5  -  01 Oct 1989  -  URL: http://www.lobster-magazine.co.uk/online/issue18/lob18-06.htm
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