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Search results for: surveillance in all categories

195 results found.

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... Facilitating Tyranny? Glenn Greenwald and the creation of the NSA's 'Panopticon' Citizenseven No Place to Hide: Edward Snowden, the NSA and the Surveillance State Glenn Greenwald London: Hamish Hamilton, 2014 Since becoming the conduit for the trove of classified documents from former National Security Agency (NSA) contractor Edward Snowden, Greenwald's public profile has increased immeasurably.1 In 2013 he was joint winner of the George Polk Award for National Security Reporting and in 2014 the Guardian received a Pulitzer prize for the reporting he led on the Snowden revelations.2 Curiously, for someone who once wrote a book taking issue with the emergence of a judicial environment that clearly favours the rich, Greenwald has partnered with billionaire Pierre ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 296  -  21 Jul 2016  -  URL: http://www.lobster-magazine.co.uk/free/lobster72/lob72-no-place-to-hide.pdf
... Literary Spying British Writers and MI5 Surveillance 1930-1960 James Smith Cambridge University Press, 2013, £55.00, h/b John Newsinger Smith's book is an immensely valuable preliminary examination of the British secret state's surveillance of 'the left-wing writers and artists' of George Orwell's generation. As the author makes clear, the context was very different from the United States. In Britain surveillance of the arts and artists was not informed by any US-style Red Scare. In Britain, he argues, 'MI5's activity was much more circumspect and rarely resulted in direct forms of censorship', let alone any 'explosive arrests'. MI5, unlike the FBI, did not have a Book Review Section, examining ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 191  -  13 Aug 2013  -  URL: http://www.lobster-magazine.co.uk/free/lobster66/lob66-literary-spying.pdf
3. Web Update [Lobster #40 (Winter 2000/1)]
... is 101521.3515@compuserve.com Electronic Privacy/ECHELON The importance of taking advantage of the current debate about Echelon summarised by Nicky Hager:'...the lack of serious debate can protect the intelligence agencies from political accountability and control...it is probably the best opportunity we will have for many years to build public undertanding and impose controls on surveillance technology.' http://www.heise.de/tp/english/inhalt/te/8472/1.html (2 August '00) In Europe: On July 5 2000 the European Parliament voted to set up a 36 member Temporary Committee on the Echelon interception system, which is instructed to verify the existence of Echelon and to determine whether ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 113  -  01 Dec 2000  -  URL: http://www.lobster-magazine.co.uk/online/issue40/lob40-23.htm
4. Enduring Freedom [Lobster #47 (Summer 2004)]
... 'new world' of post-Cold War era of globalisation and cultural-religious conflict? And who is benefiting from this hyper-technological world, those struggling to overturn or to impose a world government of the powerful? Todd and Bloch's recurring themes are the anti-civil liberty implications of terrorist legislation, and the supreme failure of the UK and US intelligence forces amidst the 'new surveillance culture' of the modern world. This broader culture is formed from three compelling factors: what the authors call the 'Washington consensus' on economic organisation (whereby everything should be quantified and expressed in numerical measures of value), the deepening digital revolution and, finally, the process of globalisation. The book's subplot is clearly the language ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 94  -  01 Jun 2004  -  URL: http://www.lobster-magazine.co.uk/online/issue47/lob47-36.htm
5. Surf's up! Internet sites of interest [Lobster #31 (Jun 1996)]
... /www.phoenix.ca:80/mossad/ Site set up by an ex-Mossad case officer Victor Ostrovsky. Menu includes organisation, recruitment methods, liaison (covert and overt) and spycraft. Censorship/Civil liberties Electronic Frontier Foundation http://www.eff.org 'Non profit civil liberties organisation. Censorship, civil liberties etc, legislation and regulation, privacy, surveillance, cryptography, Scientology and the Net; Communications Decency Act, journalism and media, computers and academic freedom. FTP address: ftp.eff.org path: /pub/EFF/* Civil Rights and Liberties address: ftp.spies.com path: /Library/Article/Rights/* Censorship, banned computer material, banned books (in US academic institutions ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 82  -  01 Jun 1996  -  URL: http://www.lobster-magazine.co.uk/online/issue31/lob31-24.htm
... ) www.lobster-magazine.co.uk (Issue 49) Summer 2005 Last| Contents| Next Issue 49 Malcolm Kennedy: complaint to Investigatory Powers Tribunal not upheld Jane Affleck Previous articles in Lobster (issues 39, 41, 43, 45) have followed Malcolm Kennedy's case. The human rights organisation Liberty took his complaint about interference with his communications and other forms of surveillance and harassment, to the Investigatory Powers Tribunal. The IPT is the body set up under the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000 (RIPA) to hear complaints relating to conduct by the Security and Intelligence agencies, and complaints about phone-tapping. It also deals with claims under the Human Rights Act 1998, s7(1 )( a ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 74  -  01 Jun 2005  -  URL: http://www.lobster-magazine.co.uk/online/issue49/lob49-20.htm
7. Web Update [Lobster #36 (Winter 1998/9)]
... of privacy in 50 countries. Includes Threats to Privacy; The Right to Privacy; Technologies of Privacy Invasion. The report was written by Privacy International; the primary authors are David Banisar of EPIC and Simon Davies of PI. Privacy International http://www.privacy.org/pi/ UK-based human rights group formed in 1990 as a watchdog on surveillance by governments and corporations. Campaigns to counter abuses of privacy by way of information technology such as telephone tapping, ID card systems, video surveillance, data matching, police information systems, etc. News; activities; issues; resources; conferences; links. Includes UK Privacy Page (www.privacy.org/pi/countries/uk/) ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 70  -  01 Dec 1998  -  URL: http://www.lobster-magazine.co.uk/online/issue36/lob36-22.htm
8. UFOs and the governments of the USA and UK [Lobster #32 (Dec 1996)]
... (5) Copies of any serious UCT event are sent to the Missions Systems Integration Board (MSIB). MSIB is composed of all NORAD and US Space Command directorates and senior level representatives from Naval Space Command, Army Space Command and Air Force Space Command.(6) The regulations governing the UFO topic is USR 55-12, Space Surveillance Network (SSN) of June 1 1992, classified by multiple sources. 'This regulation provides policy and guidance for operations of the worldwide Space Surveillance Network (SSN). It applies to Headquarters US Space Command; the component commands, Headquarters Air Force Space Command; the Naval Space Command, and Army Space Command; the Space Surveillance ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 65  -  01 Dec 1996  -  URL: http://www.lobster-magazine.co.uk/online/issue32/lob32-07.htm
... was negotiating dangerous terrain. His publisher had been approached by Rear Admiral D. M. Pulvertaft, secretary of the Defence Press and Broadcasting Committee (the 'D' Notice Committee), for a pre-publication view of material relating to the SAS. Harper Collins refused. In retrospect, Geraghty told the Observer, 'its probable I had been under surveillance for some months'. He had some intimations of trouble and 'got on with the normal, end-of-book weeding of files with more than usual urgency'. What had seemed like paranoia at the time, after the raid 'became prudence'. He now assumes that his home and his telephone are bugged. 'Suddenly I was learning what it ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 62  -  01 Jun 1999  -  URL: http://www.lobster-magazine.co.uk/online/issue37/lob37-16.htm
10. Electronic Privacy and the Encryption Debate [Lobster #37 (Summer 1999)]
... agencies from conducting wiretaps.(2) Digital communications services generally convert telephone conversations and other transmissions into a digital code that is impossible to 'listen in' on. The digital telephony act requires all telephone companies to make digital communications available to law enforcement officials in the same way that traditional voice transmissions are currently accessible, and to install increased surveillance capabilities into their networks. Despite the fact that Congress intended CALEA to preserve, not expand, the surveillance powers of the FBI and other law enforcement agencies, since its enactment the FBI has sought to use CALEA to require additional surveillance features, such as the capability to track the location of cellular phone users, and an increase in ...
Terms matched: 1  -  Score: 61  -  01 Jun 1999  -  URL: http://www.lobster-magazine.co.uk/online/issue37/lob37-09.htm
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